The Farm at 64

We support Porridge and Rice.
Charity Number 1155841
www.porridgeandrice.co.uk

The logo of the charity Porridge and Rice fighting poverty in the
        Nairobi slums of Kenya

The Farm at 64

I don't really have a farm. I don't even have a small holding. I just keep a number of small animals as pets that I share with the public in aid of the charity Porridge and Rice a few times a year when I am not tutoring maths, english or another subject as KS Learning.

I live in Whitton in the UK about 10 minutes from Heathrow between Hounlsow and Twickenham in Greater London. I live with my wife, 3 children, 1 dog, 2 rabbits, 7 Pekin ducks, a flock of Pekin bantam chickens, 4 chinchillas, several guinea pigs, a group of African Pygmy hedgehogs, and numerous birds like a number of budgies, various finches, diamond doves, Zebra doves, and Chinese painted quails.

I am not a vet, but I am happy to share the knowledge I have acquired through personal experience. So whether you want to know about keeping chickens, breeding guinea pigs or how to care for a pet dove, please feel free to ask.

I let my chickens wander around the garden on sunny days periodically so they are free range chickens. They help keep my garden free of pests and in return my family and I receive free range eggs from my own free range chickens. The ducks also get to roam the garden but they seem to enjoy grazing the grass more than

My Pekin Bantam Chickens scratching in the garden in summer eating pests so I can keep my gardening natural
       looking for snails and other garden pests. There is something very relaxing about watching the chickens and duck range freely around the garden. Our dog is so used to them in the garden, that she ignores them.

I breed some of the animals I keep to improve my stock. I sell extra animals to people looking for a pet or hobby breeders like myself. Keeping my animals is very expensive especially when they need the attention of the vet; selling extra stock helps with costs of keeping my animals, albeit only a little. It is a wonderful hobby but not a business. If you are looking for something that I breed and it isn't listed, contact me to find out whether I have stock as it can sometimes take a while for me to update my For Sale page.

I welcome visitors by arrangement either to buy or pet an animal. If it is the latter, all I ask is a donation for the charity I support, Porridge and Rice, which supports schools in the Nairobi slums in Kenya. Please contact me if you wish to visit to see an animal for sale or just to pet a chicken, a duck, or a rabbit

I arrange open days 3 to 4 days a year when people can visit to see and pet my animals for themselves. There are usually other activities on these open days like face painting, balloon modelling, and henna with all proceeds going to the charity, Porridge and Rice. So far, we have had some wonderful days with lots of people enjoying the opportunity to hold and pet the animals, and learn more about the work that the entrance fees will support.

Fertile chicken and quail eggs are available free to schools in return for a donation to the charity Porridge and Rice and I will rehome any unwanted chicks. Furthermore, if you have any additional poultry and small animals looking for a new home, please contact me to rehome them.

Finally, 'Hello' from the ducks at 64.

Pet Pekin Duck at the summer Hampton Hill Fair looking inquisitive Pet Pekin Duck at the summer Hampton Hill Fair looking inquisitive Pet Pekin Duck at the summer Hampton Hill Fair looking inquisitive

Animal Information


Keeping Chickens

Keeping chickens as pets in your garden will keep it free of snails and other pests

There is something very relaxing seeing chickens scratching in the garden looking for worms and bugs.


Budgie Breeding

Baby budgies showing their colours as feathers appear in a nest box

Generally they are easy to breed, aren't expensive to buy and cages can be purchased for sensible money.


Keeping Rabbits

Rabbits can make good pets if cared for properly and are friendly towards children

Cute and friendly, provided they are properly cared for, rabbits can make good pets for adults and children.

NATURE IN THE NEWS, the weird and wonderful lives of plants and animals

large parts of the great barrier reef have been bleached (died) by rising water temperatures

Giraffes facing 'silent extinction' as population plunges

A dramatic drop in giraffe populations over the past 30 years has seen the world's tallest land mammal classified as vulnerable to extinction.

Numbers have gone from around 155,000 in 1985 to 97,000 in 2015 according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The iconic animal has declined because of habitat loss, poaching and civil unrest in parts of Africa.

Some populations are growing, mainly in southern parts of the continent.

BBC News, 8 December 2016

large parts of the great barrier reef have been bleached (died) by rising water temperatures

Seal studies reveal secret life

Located just off the coast of Northumberland, in the north of England, the Farne Islands are a haven for wildlife - especially grey seals. There are estimated to be 5,000 of them living here.

Our boat approaches one of islands and it is covered in the marine mammals; some lulling about on the rocks, others playing in the shallows.

"Grey seals spend about a third of their time hauled out and about two-thirds of their time at sea. And most of the research that's been done has been on their behaviour on the land, says Ben Burville", who has been diving with seals for years.

BBC News, 6 December 2016

large parts of the great barrier reef have been bleached (died) by rising water temperatures

Platypus venom paves way to possible diabetes treatment

Platypus venom could pave the way for new treatments for type 2 diabetes, say Australian researchers.

The males of the extraordinary semi-aquatic mammal - one of the only kind to lay eggs - have venomous spurs on the heels of their hind feet.

The poison is used to ward off adversaries.

But scientists at the University of Adelaide have discovered it contains a hormone that could help treat diabetes.

BBC News, 30 November 2016

Insects dominate the world helped by their ability to camouflage themselves

'Predator of the deep' or gentle giant?

Scientists say the giant manta ray, known as a gentle leviathan, is in fact a "predator of the deep" preying on fish and other animals.

The ray, which can grow up to 7m (23ft) across, was thought to feed on tiny floating animals at the surface.

New evidence shows much of the ray's diet is made up of food from the deep.

The finding raises questions about the future of the giant manta ray, which is listed as vulnerable.

BBC News, 30 November 2016

large parts of the great barrier reef have been bleached (died) by rising water temperatures

Great Barrier Reef suffered worst bleaching on record in 2016

Higher water temperatures in 2016 caused the worst destruction of corals ever recorded on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, a study has found.

Some 67% of corals died in the reef's worst-hit northern section, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies report said.

The situation was better in the central section, where 6% perished, while the southern reef is in good health. But scientists warn recovery could be difficult if climate change continues.

BBC News, 28 November 2016

Insects dominate the world helped by their ability to camouflage themselves

This Is Why Insects Rule the World

Clever adaptations have allowed beetles, ants, and more bugs to thrive worldwide - even in Antarctica.

When they fly up your nose or wave at you from the sugar bowl, you might not be thankful for insects.

Like it or not, though, you're surrounded - there are about 10 quintillion on Earth, including about 10 quadrillion ants.

Insects evolved 400 million years ago, among the first animals to "crawl out of the sea, shake off the mud, and ... get wings," says Katy Prudic, an entomologist at the University of Arizona.

National Geographic, 26 November 2016

The coconut crab is about 1 metre in width with a powerful huge claw

Meet the crab with the mightiest claw

The claws of coconut crabs have the strongest pinching force of any crustacean. What's more, their maximum ... BBC News, 24 November 2016

American snakes have been hit by a disease that is killing large numbers

In the last decade a mystery disease has hit American snakes

In 2006 biologists studying the only timber rattlesnakes in the state of New Hampshire recorded something ... BBC News, 23 November 2016

The great barrier reef is the home of millions of animals when mate when light and temperature are right

This week the great barrier reef mated

At 7:30pm local time on 21 November 2016, the corals of the Great Barrier Reef took part in "their annual ... BBC News, 22 November 2016

Encouraging a hedgehog to visit your garden

How to encourage hedgehogs in your garden

The British Hedgehog is in dramatic decline. A quarter of the population has been lost in the last 10 years, and the trend may continue.

Despite the bad news, it is possible for people to help the British Hedgehog fight back. Watch this video from an expert to learn how to encourage hedgehogs to visit your garden while at the same time helping them in their fight for survival.

Remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should not be approached, touched, or captured. Provided you sit quietly and do not make any sudden movements, they will normally not mind being watched.

Keeping and breeding chickens at the farm at 64
Keeping and breeding guinea pig at the farm at 64
African Pygmy Hedgehog bred at the farm of 64
Keeping and breeding chickens at the farm at 64
Keeping and breeding chickens at the farm at 64
Chinese Painted Quail Eggs
Numpty, a russel terrier, watches the free range chickens of the farm at 64
Keeping and breeding guinea pig at the farm at 64
Keeping and breeding Chinese Painted Quails at the farm at 64